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20.03.2017 17:00

For This New Zealand Parrot, “Laughter” Is Contagious

Mag.rer.nat Georg Mair Öffentlichkeitsarbeit und Kommunikation
Veterinärmedizinische Universität Wien

    When people are feeling playful, they giggle and laugh, making others around them want to laugh and play too. Now, researchers reporting in Current Biology on March 20 have found that the particularly playful kea parrot from New Zealand has a “play call” with a similarly powerful influence. When other kea hear that call, it puts them into a playful mood. The findings make kea the first known non-mammal to have such an “emotionally contagious” vocalization, the researchers say. Earlier studies had made similar findings for chimpanzees and rats.

    “We were able to use a playback of these calls to show that it animates kea that were not playing to do so,” says Raoul Schwing of the Messerli Research Institute in Austria. “The fact that at least some of these birds started playing spontaneously when no other birds had been playing suggests that, similar to human laughter, it had an emotional effect on the birds that heard it, putting them in a playful state.”

    Specific play calls instead of laughter

    Schwing and his colleagues got interested in this particular call after carefully analyzing the kea’s full vocal repertoire. It was clear to them that the play call was used in connection with the birds’ play behavior. That made them curious to know how kea in the wild would respond to the recorded calls.
    To find out, the researchers played recordings of play calls to groups of wild kea for a period of five minutes. The researchers also played other kea calls and the calls of a South Island robin as controls. When the birds heard the play calls, it led them to play more and play longer in comparison to the other sounds.

    Play calls are trigger and no invitation

    “Upon hearing the play call, many birds did not join in play that was already underway, but instead started playing with other non-playing birds, or in the case of solitary play, with an object or by performing aerial acrobatics,” the researchers write. “These instances suggest that kea weren’t ‘invited’ to play, but this specific call induced playfulness, supporting the hypothesis that play vocalizations can act as a positive emotional contagion.”
    While it might be a bit anthropomorphic, they continue, the kea play calls can be compared to a form of infectious laughter. The researchers say that they now plan to explore the effects of play and play calls on kea social groups more generally.
    For the rest of us, the findings come as an intriguing reminder: “If animals can laugh,” Schwing says, “we are not so different from them.”

    Service:
    Current Biology, Schwing et al.: “Positive emotional contagion in a New Zealand parrot” http://www.cell.com/current-biology/fulltext/S0960-9822(17)30156-2
    DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cub.2017.02.020

    About the University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna
    The University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna in Austria is one of the leading academic and research institutions in the field of Veterinary Sciences in Europe. About 1,300 employees and 2,300 students work on the campus in the north of Vienna which also houses five university clinics and various research sites. Outside of Vienna the university operates Teaching and Research Farms. http://www.vetmeduni.ac.at

    About Messerli Research Institute
    The Messerli Research Institute was founded in 2010 with support from the Messerli Foundation (Sörenberg, Switzerland) under the management of the University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna in cooperation with the Medical University of Vienna and the University of Vienna. The research is devoted to the interaction between humans and animals, as well as its theoretical principles in animal cognition and behavior, comparative medicine and ethics. Its work is characterized by its broad interdisciplinary approach (biology, human medicine, veterinary medicine, philosophy, psychology, law) and strong international focus. http://www.vetmeduni.ac.at/en/messerli/

    Author Contact:
    Raoul Schwing
    Messerli Research Institute
    University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna (Vetmeduni Vienna)
    M +43 664 602 572 695
    raoul.schwing@vetmeduni.ac.at

    Released by:
    Georg Mair
    Science Communication / Corporate Communications
    University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna (Vetmeduni Vienna)
    T +43 1 25077-1165
    georg.mair@vetmeduni.ac.at


    Weitere Informationen:

    http://www.vetmeduni.ac.at/en/infoservice/presseinformation/press-releases-2017/...


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    Specific calls of playing keas trigger playful emotions in other, non-playing birds, just as laughter does for us.


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    The play calls of the kea are no invitation but a trigger to start playing alone or with other non-playing birds.


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