Preeclampsia triggered by an overdose of gene activity

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06.10.2017 12:01

Preeclampsia triggered by an overdose of gene activity

Annette Tuffs Kommunikation
Max-Delbrück-Centrum für Molekulare Medizin in der Helmholtz-Gemeinschaft

    Preeclampsia is the most dangerous form of hypertension during a pregnancy and can be fatal for both mother and child. Though it is known to originate in the placenta, the root causes remain largely a mystery. A research team led by the Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine (MDC) has published new findings in the journal Circulation, which reveal that preeclampsia is not in fact a single disease caused solely by genetic factors. Their tests on placenta samples have shown that epigenetically regulated genes play an important role. The Berlin research team also developed an in vitro model of the disorder which demonstrates the dysregulation of an important transcription factor.

    The research team compared placental tissue samples and the genetic makeup of patients with preeclampsia with those of healthy women. The entirety of their genetic material was analyzed for genes that are differentially expressed in the preeclamptic versus healthy placentas and checked for disrupted genomic imprinting, which refers to certain genes that are “switched off” on either the paternal or maternal chromosome. This led them to identify the so-called DLX5 gene as a significant transcription factor involved in regulating the activity of other genes in preeclampsia. This gene is usually turned off – or epigenetically “imprinted” – on the paternal chromosome, controlling the proper dosage of gene expression. Due to loss of the regulation by imprinting, DLX5 was strongly upregulated in ca. 70 percent of the samples studied from preeclampsia patients, meaning the gene was switched on in these cases. This study is the first to demonstrate that a change in epigenetic gene regulation by imprinting can contribute to preeclampsia. The scientists also found three separate types of preeclampsia, supporting the view that preeclampsia is a complex disease.

    The study involved close collaboration between basic research and clinical institutes. Participants included research groups led by the molecular biologist Dr. Zsuzsanna Izsvák of the MDC and Dr. Ralf Dechend of the Helios clinic in Berlin-Buch and the Experimental and Clinical Research Center (ECRC), a joint institution of MDC and Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin. The interdisciplinary team also included researchers from the Berlin Institute of Health (BIH) and the evolution biologist Laurence Hurst from University of Bath, UK.

    Development of the in vitro cell model for preeclampsia

    Preeclampsia affects around five percent of all pregnancies. Its main symptoms are high blood pressure and protein in the urine. If these symptoms reach dangerous levels, delivery must be induced prematurely. In Germany, preeclampsia causes as many as 20,000 premature births every year. The condition occurs only in humans, and no robust animal models have been proven suitable. The development of an in vitro model is therefore of vital importance.

    Here, the Berlin-based research group achieved a real breakthrough. In their in vitro model, they increased the activity of the DLX5 gene in the trophoblastic cells – the outer layer of the embryonic cell that later builds the placenta. The cells showed an increased stress response, which is also observed in patients. This cellular system will now allow for further investigation into the different types of preeclampsia and for new medications and active agents to be found.

    Why does this condition only affect humans?

    Izsvák and Dechend are already planning the next steps: “We want to find out why this condition occurs only in humans,” says Izsvák. “We also hope to find biomarkers for the three types of preeclampsia we have identified,” adds Ralf Dechend. “These will help diagnosing or predicting the disease before the actual illness develops.“

    Reference

    Julianna Zadora, et al. (2017): “Disturbed Placental Imprinting in Preeclampsia Leads to Altered Expression of DLX5, a Human-Specific Early Trophoblast Marker.” Circulation. doi:10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.117.028110

    The Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine (MDC)

    The Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine in the Helmholtz Association (MDC) was founded in Berlin in 1992. It is named for the German-American physicist Max Delbrück, who was awarded the 1969 Nobel Prize in Physiology and Medicine. The MDC's mission is to study molecular mechanisms in order to understand the origins of disease and thus be able to diagnose, prevent and fight it better and more effectively. In these efforts the MDC cooperates with the Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin and the Berlin Institute of Health (BIH) as well as with national partners such as the German Center for Cardiovascular Research and numerous international research institutions. More than 1,600 staff and guests from nearly 60 countries work at the MDC, just under 1,300 of them in scientific research. The MDC is funded by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (90 percent) and the State of Berlin (10 percent), and is a member of the Helmholtz Association of German Research Centers. www.mdc-berlin.de


    Weitere Informationen:

    https://www.mdc-berlin.de/1153597 – Website of Zsuzsanna Izsvak's lab
    https://www.mdc-berlin.de/35590573 – Website of the groups of PD Dr. Ralf Dechend
    https://insights.mdc-berlin.de/en/2017/10/preeclampsia-triggered-overdose-gene-a... – This press release at the MDC website


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