idw – Informationsdienst Wissenschaft

Nachrichten, Termine, Experten

Grafik: idw-Logo
Medienpartner:
Wissenschaftsjahr


Teilen: 
14.05.2018 10:51

What financial markets, cancer cells, and global warming have in common

Dr. Susanne Langer Kommunikation und Presse
Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg

    A team of biophysicists from Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) presents a mathematically concise method for comparing different pricing models in their latest publication in Nature Communications. This enables researchers to predict more accurately how parameters such as the volatility of stock prices change over time.*

    The ups and downs of stock prices are the result of a complex interplay between traditional investors, day-traders and high-frequency hedge funds. The seemingly erratic short-term price fluctuations can be characterized by a diffusion constant – called volatility. However, volatility itself changes significantly over longer time scales. For example, unexpected Twitter announcements may trigger abrupt volatility spikes, while economic policy changes may induce gradual variations of volatility. Financial analysts notoriously struggle to estimate how volatility changes over time and often base their predictions on unsubstantiated assumptions.

    Instead of evaluating the uncertainty of different model predictions analytically, Christoph Mark and colleagues from the Biophysics group at FAU developed a numerical implementation of the principle of 'Occam's razor', which favors those models that describe the data with the least number of assumptions.

    The researchers use this method to show that the so-called fat-tailed distribution of stock market returns (including rare but dramatic events such as Black Fridays and market bubbles) emerges naturally from sudden volatility fluctuations. Moreover, with their method they can pinpoint the triggering events (such as news announcements) in real-time.

    Volatility fluctuations or, more generally speaking, heterogeneous random walks are not exclusive to finance, however, and also describe the movements of invasive cancer cells, the timing of accidents and disasters, and climate change. Here, their method can be used to identify particularly invasive cells, to determine political measures that may reduce accidents, or to compare different climate models to forecast global warming.

    *Mark et al., Nature Communications 9, 1803, 2018. doi: 10.1038/s41467-018-04241-5

    Further information:
    Christoph Mark
    Phone: +49 9131 8525604
    christoph.mark@fau.de


    Merkmale dieser Pressemitteilung:
    Journalisten
    Biologie, Medizin, Physik / Astronomie
    überregional
    Forschungsergebnisse, Forschungsprojekte
    Englisch


    Hilfe

    Die Suche / Erweiterte Suche im idw-Archiv
    Verknüpfungen

    Sie können Suchbegriffe mit und, oder und / oder nicht verknüpfen, z. B. Philo nicht logie.

    Klammern

    Verknüpfungen können Sie mit Klammern voneinander trennen, z. B. (Philo nicht logie) oder (Psycho und logie).

    Wortgruppen

    Zusammenhängende Worte werden als Wortgruppe gesucht, wenn Sie sie in Anführungsstriche setzen, z. B. „Bundesrepublik Deutschland“.

    Auswahlkriterien

    Die Erweiterte Suche können Sie auch nutzen, ohne Suchbegriffe einzugeben. Sie orientiert sich dann an den Kriterien, die Sie ausgewählt haben (z. B. nach dem Land oder dem Sachgebiet).

    Haben Sie in einer Kategorie kein Kriterium ausgewählt, wird die gesamte Kategorie durchsucht (z.B. alle Sachgebiete oder alle Länder).